bamboo or cotton velour? Urgent!!

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UrsulaGiles
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bamboo or cotton velour? Urgent!!

Post by UrsulaGiles » Thu Jul 12, 2012 10:50 pm

I was going to use bamboo velour as the outside and middle absorbant layer of my fitted nappies and AIO's with a trifold sewn in soaker of 2 layers of Bamboo fleece and 1 layer of microfiber, hmm righting that down makes me think that might be a bit overkill, is that way to much absorbancy? (dd regularly soaks a bamboo peapod insert and 5 layers of microfiber)

BUT

Green beans has cotton velour ( & a whole lot of other stuff) at 50% off untill tomorrow night, the cotton velour is less than half the price of the bamboo, whats the pros/cons of each and which do you think would work best? could I do the whole nappy out of Cotton velour?

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ditto
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Re: bamboo or cotton velour? Urgent!!

Post by ditto » Thu Jul 12, 2012 10:56 pm

You could use the cotton velour inside and out and something more absorbent for the soaker. I don`t find cotton and bamboo velour are that much different in practice, but my experience is only with newborn size.
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Kaz
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Re: bamboo or cotton velour? Urgent!!

Post by Kaz » Fri Jul 13, 2012 6:53 am

Not much difference in absorbency.
Bamboo tends to be a bit smoother to touch.
Bamboo has a lower burn temperature, so you have to be careful if you dry nappies near the fire.
Bamboo tends to take a bit longer to dry as well

Try not to have more than 3 layers sewn together or you'll die waiting for anything to dry.
Consider using the bamboo fleece as the internal layer of the fitted, depending on fabric weight you'll get more absorbency.

:D have fun sewing
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Harm Less Solutions
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Re: bamboo or cotton velour? Urgent!!

Post by Harm Less Solutions » Mon Jul 16, 2012 1:00 pm

Kaz wrote:Not much difference in absorbency.
Bamboo tends to be a bit smoother to touch.
Bamboo has a lower burn temperature, so you have to be careful if you dry nappies near the fire.
Bamboo tends to take a bit longer to dry as well


Try not to have more than 3 layers sewn together or you'll die waiting for anything to dry.
Consider using the bamboo fleece as the internal layer of the fitted, depending on fabric weight you'll get more absorbency.

:D have fun sewing
I'm presently putting together an introductory posting of our fabric range (and other items) but got sidetracked by this thread.
(What did somebody say about "Something wrong on the internet"? :wink: )

In regard to the two points above please be aware that bamboo viscose has a similar, if not higher, burn temperature than cotton. The exception is if the fabric has a synthetic content.

As bamboo has a higher absorbancy (per fabric weight) than cotton and other fabrics that affinity for water is also reflected in the time and effort required to then extract that moisture (i.e. drying). As they say "there's no such thing as a free lunch" :D
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Kaz
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Re: bamboo or cotton velour? Urgent!!

Post by Kaz » Mon Jul 16, 2012 2:05 pm

Harm Less Solutions wrote:I'm presently putting together an introductory posting of our fabric range (and other items) but got sidetracked by this thread.
(What did somebody say about "Something wrong on the internet"? :wink: )

In regard to the two points above please be aware that bamboo viscose has a similar, if not higher, burn temperature than cotton. The exception is if the fabric has a synthetic content.

As bamboo has a higher absorbancy (per fabric weight) than cotton and other fabrics that affinity for water is also reflected in the time and effort required to then extract that moisture (i.e. drying). As they say "there's no such thing as a free lunch" :D
My points aren't wrong :D just to clarify (bearing in mind that most bamboo fabrics on the market in NZ have some synthetic component)
The Bamboo fabric that was asked about does have a lower burn point than cotton (fact, demonstrated in my son's science fair project) and yes it has happened bamboo nappies have started burning near the fire when the cotton ones have not. I know this from experience. :wink:

My comments on similar absorbency are based on experience and yet another science fair project that showed while there was a difference in absorbency per weight it wasn't a huge amount.

Bamboo does take longer to dry than cotton, hence the suggestion to limit the layers.

Since I've been using cloth nappies and making them for the last 16yrs I think I know what I'm talking about :wink:
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Harm Less Solutions
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Re: bamboo or cotton velour? Urgent!!

Post by Harm Less Solutions » Mon Jul 16, 2012 4:47 pm

Kaz wrote: My points aren't wrong :D just to clarify (bearing in mind that most bamboo fabrics on the market in NZ have some synthetic component)
.....
Apologies 8-[ No offence meant, or taken.
Our fabrics are relatively new to the New Zealand market and apart from our Velour and Double Loop Terry which contain 2% 'poly' the only other synthetic content in our fabrics is the Spandex/Lycra in our stretch Jersey and Fleece, and French Terry.

Incidentally fabric care for our Bambu Dru clothing (and therefore fabrics) recommends gentle wash and dry cycles with a 60 degree C maximum so "fire drying" is pushing fabric performance somewhat. Incidentally though our dyehouse uses 85 degrees C to do our coloured garment with minimal shrinkage as a result.
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